At a Veteran's Grave on Memorial Day


Though I didn't know this solider as I read his name,
I know what he gave, and that's why I came.
He lies at rest 'neath this carved granite stone.
Our Heavenly Father has called him Home. With his blood, he purchased my precious liberty;
With his life defended my right to be free.
He did not question his country's call;
He answered, and he gave his all. As I place these blossoms, fragile and sweet,
Let me always remember that a soldier's feet
Took him where duty led the way,
And I honor him with love and tears today. Thank you, brave warrior, for what you've done.
So much depended on so many--and this one.
Then, let our remembrance of you never cease.
Welcome home, brother...may you rest in peace.

Kathy L. Sheridan - Memorial Day, 2001




This page is dedicated to all the missing
men whose so courageously
fought for our country.




My adopted POW/MIA are:


Charles Elbert Finney

Steven Ray Armistead

Elbert Wayne Bush

Charles Franklin Wallace

Walter Joseph Taylor, Jr.

Franklin Zollicoffer




Charles Finney



Steven Armistead



Elbert Wayne Bush









Name: Charles Elbert Finney
Rank/Branch: O3/US Marine Corps
Unit: VMA 533, Marine Air Group 12, 1st Marine Air Wing
Date of Birth: 05 August 1944
Home City of Record: Saltville MS
Date of Loss: 17 March 1969
Country of Loss: Laos
Loss Coordinates: 161900N 1063300E (XD530190)
Status (in 1973): Missing In Action
Category: 2
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: A6A
Refno: 1409

REMAINS RETURNED 03/15/00

Other Personnel In Incident: Steven R. Armistead (missing)

Source: Compiled by Homecoming II Project 15 June 1990 from one or more of
the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence
with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W. NETWORK 1998.

REMARKS:
SYNOPSIS: The Grumman A6 Intruder is a two-man all weather, low-altitude, carrier based attack plane, with versions adapted as aerial tanker and electronic warfare platform. The A6A primarily flew close-air-support, all weather and night attacks on enemy troop concentrations, and night interdiction missions. Its advanced navigation and attack system, known as DIANE (Digital Integrated Attack navigation Equipment) allowed small precision targets, such as bridges, barracks and fuel depots to be located and attacked in all weather conditions, day or night. The planes were credited with some of the most difficult single-plane strikes in the war, including the destruction of the Hai Duong bridge between Hanoi and Haiphong by a single A6. Their missions were tough, but their crews among the most talented and most courageous to serve the United States.

1LT Steven R. Armistead was the pilot and Capt. Charles E. Finney was the bombardier/navigator on board an A6A Intruder aircraft sent on a night mission over Laos on March 17, 1969. The mission was in support of air activity being conducted by the 7th Air Force.

When the aircraft had completed its target strike, it was hit by enemy fire and went down near the city of Muong Nong, located southwest of the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in Savannakhet Province, Laos. Air searches proved unsuccessful, and both men were listed as Missing In Action.

The Defense Intelligence Agency further expanded Armistead's and Finney's classifications to include an enemy knowledge ranking of 2. Category 2 indicates "suspect knowledge" and includes personnel who may have been involved in loss incidents with individuals reported in Category 1 (confirmed knowledge), or who were lost in areas or under conditions that they may reasonably be expected to be known by the enemy; who were connected with an incident which was discussed but not identified by names in enemy news media; or identified (by elimination, but not 100% positively) through analysis of all-source intelligence.

Finney and Armistead are among nearly 600 Americans lost in the country of Laos during the Vietnam War. Although the numbers of men actually termed "prisoner of war" are quite low, this can be explained in understanding the blanket of security surrounding the "secret war" the U.S. waged in Laos. To protect the public perception that we "were not in Laos," details of many loss incidents were "rearranged" to show a loss or casualty in South Vietnam. Only a handful of publicly-exposed cases were ever acknowledged POW, even though scores of pilots and ground personnel were known to have been alive and well at last contact (thus increasing the chance they were captured alive).

The Lao communist faction, the Pathet Lao, stated on several occasions they held "tens of tens" of American prisoners, but the Pathet Lao were not included in the Paris Peace agreements ending American involvement in the war. Consequently, no American POWs held in Laos were negotiated for. Not one American held in Laos has ever been released. They were abandoned to the enemy.

Reports continue to be received that Americans are alive today, being held captive. Whether Armistead and Finney are among them is not known. What is certain, however, is that they deserve better than the abandonment they received at the hands of the country they so proudly served.

Charles Finney attended the military academy at West Point, and had been named first, to the Marine Corps Honor Guard, and later to the Silent Drill Team. He was promoted to the rank of Captain during the period he was maintained missing.
Steven R. Armistead was promoted to the rank of Major during the period he was missing.




No. 125-00
(703)697-5131(media)
IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 14, 2000
(703)697-5737(public/industry)

VIETNAM WAR REMAINS IDENTIFIED

Two servicemen missing in action from the Vietnam War have been accounted for and are being returned to their families for burial in the United States.

They are identified as Navy Cmdr. James W. Hall, Los Angeles; and Marine Maj. Charles E. Finney, Saltillo, Miss.

On Oct. 28, 1972, Hall took off from the carrier USS America in his A-7C Corsair on a surface-to-air missile suppression mission. Over the target area in Nghe An province, North Vietnam, Hall was heard to radio to his wingman, "Two SAMs (surface-to-air missiles) lifting at 12 o'clock." No other radio messages were heard. The first missile missed his wingman, but the second struck Hall's aircraft. No parachute was observed, and no emergency radio beepers were heard.

In 1989, Vietnam repatriated to the United States 15 boxes allegedly containing the remains of U.S. servicemen. One was believed to be Hall, but forensic science at the time could not confirm an identification. His case was placed in a hold status pending the receipt of new evidence or the development of new forensic techniques that would assist in the identification.

Joint U.S.-Vietnamese teams, led by the Joint Task Force-Full Accounting, conducted investigations and excavations at suspected crash sites in 1993 and 1994. They found no remains, but did recover several pilot-related items. Mitochondrial DNA testing assisted in confirming the identity of the remains recovered in 1989.

On March 17, 1969, Finney was flying in an A-6A aircraft on a night armed reconnaissance mission over Laos. Crewmen from other aircraft in the area observed an explosion in the vicinity of the target, then a second explosion nearby which was believed to be that of Finney's aircraft. There were no parachutes sighted and no emergency beepers were heard. Search and rescue efforts were terminated several days later when no signs of survivors were found.

In 1995 and 1999, joint U.S.-Lao teams interviewed local villagers in the area of the crash, then conducted an excavation in Savannakhet province. A local worker turned over a military identification tag relating to Finney's fellow crewmember. The team also recovered numerous pieces of aircraft wreckage, personal effects and possible human remains. This evidence aided in the final identification.

With the accounting of Hall and Finney, 2,029 servicemen remain missing in action from the Vietnam War. Another 554 have been identified and returned to their families since the end of the war. Analysis of the remains and other evidence by the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory Hawaii confirmed the identification of these two men.



Name: Steven Ray Armistead
Rank/Branch: O2/US Marine Corps
Unit: VMA 533, Marine Air Group 12
Date of Birth: 15 June 1944
Home City of Record: Los Angeles CA
Date of Loss: 17 March 1969
Country of Loss: Laos
Loss Coordinates: 161900N 1063300E (XD530190)
Status (in 1973): Missing In Action
Category: 2
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: A6A
Refno: 1409

Other Personnel In Incident: Charles E. Finney (missing)

Source: Compiled by Homecoming II Project 15 June 1990 from one or more of the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W. NETWORK.

REMARKS:
SYNOPSIS: The Grumman A6 Intruder is a two-man all weather, low-altitude, carrier based attack plane, with versions adapted as aerial tanker and
electronic warfare platform. The A6A primarily flew close-air-support, all weather and night attacks on enemy troop concentrations, and night interdiction missions. Its advanced navigation and attack system, known as DIANE (Digital Integrated Attack navigation Equipment) allowed small precision targets, such as bridges, barracks and fuel depots to be located and attacked in all weather conditions, day or night. The planes were credited with some of the most difficult single-plane strikes in the war, including the destruction of the Hai Duong bridge between Hanoi and Haiphong by a single A6. Their missions were tough, but their crews among the most talented and most courageous to serve the United States.

1LT Steven R. Armistead was the pilot and Capt. Charles E. Finney was the bombardier/navigator on board an A6A Intruder aircraft sent on a night mission over Laos on March 17, 1969. The mission was in support of air activity being conducted by the 7th Air Force.

When the aircraft had completed its target strike, it was hit by enemy fire and went down near the city of Muong Nong, located southwest of the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in Savannakhet Province, Laos. Air searches proved unsuccessful, and both men were listed as Missing In Action.

The Defense Intelligence Agency further expanded Armistead's classifications to include an enemy knowledge ranking of 2. Category 2 indicates "suspect knowledge" and includes personnel who may have been involved in loss incidents with individuals reported in Category 1 (confirmed knowledge), or who were lost in areas or under conditions that they may reasonably be expected to be known by the enemy; who were connected with an incident which was discussed but not identified by names in enemy news media; or identified (by elimination, but not 100% positively) through analysis of all-source intelligence.

Armistead are among nearly 600 Americans lost in the country of Laos during the Vietnam War. Although the numbers of men actually termed "prisoner of war" are quite low, this can be explained in understanding the blanket of security surrounding the "secret war" the U.S. waged in Laos. To protect the public perception that we "were not in Laos," details of many loss incidents were "rearranged" to show a loss or casualty in South Vietnam. Only a handful of publicly-exposed cases were ever acknowledged POW, even though scores of pilots and ground personnel were known to have been alive and well at last contact (thus increasing the chance they were captured alive).

The Lao communist faction, the Pathet Lao, stated on several occasions they held "tens of tens" of American prisoners, but the Pathet Lao were not included in the Paris Peace agreements ending American involvement in the war. Consequently, no American POWs held in Laos were negotiated for. Not one American held in Laos has ever been released. They were abandoned to the enemy. Steven R. Armistead was promoted to the rank of Major during the period he was missing.



These comments came from Mark- who served with Steve and Chuck:

"The loss of Steve and Chuck is something that will probably be forever etched in my mind. I was sitting in the Operations area on the night they were shot down. Major Pete Busch came in and said "Murph, I've got some bad news". He then told me that Steve and Chuck had been shot down somewhere in Laos and that there had not been any communication from them. The only word they had gotten was from another crew that was in the area and they said that Steve and Chuck were on a low level bombing run and had taken a hit from anti aircraft fire and almost immediately, they saw the impact explosion of their plane on the ground. There probably would not have been time between the "hit" and the explosion on impact for either Steve or Chuck to eject. Still, to this day, I hold on to the hope that they did, in fact, eject successfully."




Name: Elbert Wayne Bush
Rank/Branch: Sergeant First Class/US Army
Unit: AGC Army Advisory Group Headquarters MACV
Date of Birth: 31 October 1946 (Starksville, MS)
Home of Record: Jackson, MS
Date of Loss: 08 January 1973
Country of Loss: South Vietnam
Loss Coordinates: 16421N 1070956E (YD324528)
Staus in 1973: Missing In Action
Category: 1
Aircaft/Vehicle/Ground: UH1H "Iroquois"

Other Personnel in Incident: Manuel A. Lauterio; William L. Deane; Richard A. Knutson; William S. Stinson; Mickey A. Wilson (all missing)

Remains Recovered 27 August 1996; Identified 4 October 1999

REMARKS:
By early 1967, the Bell UH1 Iroquois was already the standard Army assault helicopter, and was used in nearly every "in-country" mission. Better known by its nickname "Huey," the troop carriers were referred to as "slicks" and the gunships were called "Hogs." It proved itself to be a sturdy, versatile aircraft which was called on to carry out a wide variety of missions including search and rescue, close air support, insertion and extraction, fire support, and resupply to name a few. It usually carried a crew of four.

On 8 January 1973, WO1 Mickey A. Wilson, aircraft commander; WO1 Richard A. Knutson, pilot; SP5 Manuel A. Lauterio, crew chief; and SP5 William S. Stinson, gunner; comprised the crew of a UH1H helicopter (serial #69-15619). This aircrew flew missions in support of the Senior American Advisor to the Vietnamese Airborne Division in Quang Tri and Thua Thien Provinces and frequently flew missions between the provincial capitals of Hue and Quang Tri. All four crewmen were assigned to the 62nd Aviation Company, 1st Aviation Battalion, 11th Combat Aviation Group. Also on board the Huey were passengers Maj. William L. Dean and then SSgt. Elbert W. Bush who were assigned to Army Advisory Group, Headquarter, Military Assistance Command - Vietnam.

At 1430 hours, the aircraft departed one Landing Zone (LZ) enroute to others in the area on a support mission. For unknown reasons, the crew did so without making the usual radio contact with the 2nd Battalion Technical Operations Center. When no radio contact was received by 1500 hours, the operations center queried all LZs on the aircraft's briefed route to ascertain its whereabouts. The center was informed that the helicopter failed to land at two of the designated LZs. Likewise, no one at those LZs established radio contact with the missing aircraft.

The Huey's intended route would have taken it northwest toward Quang Tri City, then to a point southwest of the city where it would turn west to a LZ located just south of the Thach Han River. Even though there was no radio contact with the Huey, it was observed by American ground forces as it flew northwest toward Quang Tri City, then instead of turning to the west as briefed, the witnesses saw the helicopter cross the Thach Han River into enemy held territory. While it was northwest of the river, it was seen to circle with its door guns blazing. Enemy automatic weapons fire was heard by ground personnel who also reported the helicopter took a direct hit in the tail boom by a missile, reportedly an SA7, forcing it to land in hostile territory. The Huey disappeared in a hotly contested area covered with double canopy jungle and laced with numerous rivers and streams approximately 1 mile northwest of the Thach Han River, 3 miles southwest of Quang Tri City, the same distance southwest of Highway 1 and 8 miles south-southeast of Dong Ha, Quang Tri Province, South Vietnam.

Aerial search and rescue (SAR) efforts were initiated immediately and continued through 9 January. These searches failed to locate any trace of either the damaged aircraft or its crew and passengers in the dense jungle below. At the time formal SAR operations were terminated, Mickey Wilson, Richard Knutson, Manuel Lauterio, William Stinson, William Deane and Elbert Bush were all listed Missing in Action.

Almost immediately US intelligence began receiving reports indicating that of the six men aboard the UH1H, four were seen alive on the ground. The families of the men assumed their loved ones would be released with the other POWs, and some families were even so informed. Unfortunately none were.

In early 1973, 591 American Prisoners of War were released by the communists during Operation Homecoming. All returnees were debriefed by US intelligence to include any information each possessed about other Americans who were known or believed to be prisoners and who were not released from captivity. According to an Air Force air crewman released from one of the camps in Hanoi, he reported he had direct contact and a conversation with Richard Knutson while in captivity. Less substantial information was received from a released Navy pilot who provided hearsay information about William Deane also being held captive. None of the returned POWs was able to provide any information about Mickey Wilson, Manuel Lauterio, William Stinson or Elbert Bush.

No further information about the fate of the crew and passengers aboard the Huey was forthcoming until 8 February 1994. At that time the remains of Richard Knutson were returned without explanation to US control. These remains were identified by the Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii (CIL-HI) as belonging to WO Knutson on 28 November 1995. For the remainder of the crew, unanswered questions existed until 27 August 1996 when bone fragments recovered during a joint American/Vietnamese excavation of their aircraft's crash site were identified by CIL-HI as belonging to William Deane, Mickey Wilson, Manuel Lauterio, William Stinson and Elbert Bush.

The fate of all six men aboard the UH1H, serial #69-15619, has been resolved and their families have the comfort of knowing where each man's mortal remains lie. For other Americans who remain unaccounted for in Indochina, their fates continue to be unknown.

Since the end of the Vietnam War well over 21,000 reports of American prisoners, missing and otherwise unaccounted for have been received by our government. Many of these reports document LIVE American Prisoners of War remaining captive throughout Southeast Asia TODAY.

Pilots and aircrews in Vietnam were called upon to fly in many dangerous circumstances, and they were prepared to be wounded, killed or captured. It probably never occurred to them that they could be abandoned by the country they so proudly served.



Name: Charles Franklin Wallace
Unit: VMA 121 MAG 15
Date of Birth: 27 May 1929
Home City of Record: ELLISVILLE MS
Date of Loss: 28 August 1967
Country of Loss: North Vietnam
Loss Coordinates: 0 0
Status (in 1973): Killed In Action/Body Not Recovered
Category: 5
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: A4E
Other Personnel in Incident:

Source: Compiled by P.O.W. NETWORK from one or more of the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews and CACCF = Combined Action Combat Casualty File.
CACCF/CRASH/PILOT/16 YRS UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS
No further information available at this time.



Name: Walter Joseph Taylor, Jr.
Rank/Branch: E3/US Army
Unit: Company B, 158th Aviation Battalion, 101st Airborne Division
Date of Birth: 30 October 1947
Home City of Record: Moss Point MS
Date of Loss: 06 December 1970
Country of Loss: South Vietnam/Over Water
Loss Coordinates: 160903N 1081308E (BZ013850)
Status (in 1973): Killed/Body Not Recovered
Category: 4
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: UH1M
Refno: 1682
Source: Compiled from one or more of the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W. NETWORK in 1998.

Other Personnel in Incident: (none missing)

REMARKS:
SYNOPSIS: On December 6, 1970, PFC Joseph Taylor was serving as a door gunner on a UH1M helicopter when it crashed into the South China Sea near the Da Nang Harbor. The aircraft failed to recover from a very steep dive being maneuvered. (Note: The UH1M, was not a particularly common version of the Huey used in Vietnam. The M model was essentially the same as a UH1C, with the addition of a more powerful engine.)

PFC Taylor was last seen by the aircraft commander about one minute prior to the crash of the aircraft. Upon impact with the water the helicopter exploded and burned. Rescue teams recovered the pilot and aircraft commander and several days later, the body of the crew chief. Navy divers also recovered a portion of the aircraft, but no trace of Taylor was found.

It was the opinion of the U.S. Army that Taylor died on December 6, 1970. Because his body was not recovered, Taylor is listed among the nearly 2500 Americans missing from the Vietnam war.

For others who are missing, determination of death is not possible. Some of the missing were last seen being led away by enemy troops. A few wrote home from POW camps, but were not released at the end of the war. Others were in radio contact with search and rescue teams and advised them of their imminent capture. Some simply disappeared.

Since the war ended, thousands of reports have accumulated indicating that hundreds of Americans are still alive, captives in Southeast Asia. While Taylor is probably not one of them, one can imagine him willingly flying one more mission to help bring them home.



Name: Franklin Zollicoffer
Rank/Branch: E4/US Army
Unit: U.S. Army Installation - Pleiku
Date of Birth: 22 November 1950 (Attala County, MS)

Home City of Record: Kosciusko MS
Date of Loss: 24 April 1972
Country of Loss: South Vietnam

Loss Coordinates: 143918N 1074711E (ZB001219)
Status (in 1973): Killed/Body Not Recovered Category: 3
Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: Ground
Refno: 1833

Source: Compiled from one or more of the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency sources, correspondence with POW/MIA families, published sources, interviews. Updated by the P.O.W. NETWORK in 1998.

Other Personnel in Incident: Robert W. Brownlee; George W. Carter; James E. Hunsicker; Johnny M. Jones; Kenneth J. Yonan; Wade L. Ellen (all missing); Charles M. Lea; Rickey V. Vogel (helicopter crew, rescued); Julius G. Warmath; John P. Keller; Walter H. Ward (helicopter passengers, rescued); Charles W. Gordon, Cao Ky Chi (evaded capture near Dak To)

REMARKS: KIA ON ISLE - 5 RCV - NT SUBJ - J
SYNOPSIS: On the evening of April 23, 1972, Capt. Kenneth J. Yonan accompanied his ARVN counterpart to a water tower located on the northwestern edge of the Tanh Canh base camp compound near Dak To, Kontum Province, South Vietnam. Yonan was an advisor assigned to Advisory Team 22, MACV, and was assisting the ARVN 42nd Regiment based there.

At about 0530 hours on April 24, Capt. Yonan was still in the water tower when Viet Cong attacked the camp perimeter. Although tanks fired at and hit the water tower, two other advisors spoke to Capt. Yonan after the firing and Yonan reported that he was not hit and planned to join the other advisors when it was safe to do so. Radio contact was maintained with Yonan until 0730 hours. The other U.S. advisors began escape and evasion operations from the beleaguered compound.

Team 22 Advisors Maj. George W. Carter, Maj. Julius G. Warmath, and Capt. John P. Keller, were extracted by helicopter. The aircraft was a UH1H from the 52nd Aviation Battalion, 17th Aviation Group, (serial #69-15715) and was flown by Lt. James E. Hunsicker. WO Wade L. Ellen was the co-pilot of the chopper, and SP4 Charles M. Lea, and SP5 Rickey V. Vogel were crewmen. Other persons extracted included 1st Lt. Johnny M. Jones, from the 52nd Aviation Battalion; SP4 Franklin Zollicoffer, from the U.S. Army Installation at Pleiku, and Sgt. Walter H. Ward, unit not specified.

The helicopter departed to the northwest from Dak To, but was apparently hit by enemy fire, as it crashed and burned on a small island in the Dak Poko River about 500 meters from the end of the dock to the runway. Because of the rolling terrain, personnel at the airfield did not see the aircraft impact. A pilot flying over the wreckage reported that the helicopter was burning, but they could see no survivors. It was later discovered that five people did survive the crash - Warmath, Keller, Vogel, Ward and Lea. According to their statements, Hunsicker, Ellen, Zollicoffer, Jones and Carter were all dead.

Two other Team 22, MACV Advisors, Lt. Col. Robert W. Brownlee and Capt. Charles W. Gordon, and their ARVN interpreter, Sgt. Cao Ky Chi, were in a bunker near the airstrip approximately 4 kilometers to the west of the base camp when they were forced to withdraw under heavy enemy attack. They proceeded south of the compound across the Dak Poko River, but Lt. Col. Brownlee became separated from the others as they were advancing up a hill. Sgt. Chi and Capt. Gordon called out to him, but received no response. From the top of the hill, Sgt. Chi heard the enemy call out to someone in Vietnamese to halt and raise their hands. Sgt. Chi believed the Viet Cong were speaking to Lt. Col. Brownlee. Gordon and Chi evaded capture and eventually made their way to safety.

A Vietnamese who was captured and subsequently released reported that he had talked to another prisoner who had witnessed Lt. Col. Brownlee's death. He was told that Lt. Col. Brownlee had killed himself with his own pistol when communist soldiers told him to raise his hands in an attempt to capture him. Additional hearsay reports of his suicide were reported by another ARVN.

Yonan never caught up with the others. For three days, helicopter searches were made of the area with no success. Ground search, because of the hostile threat in the area, was not practical.

In April 1988, the Vietnamese "discovered" the remains of Capt. Kenneth J. Yonan and returned them to the U.S. in a spirit of stepped-up cooperation on the POW/MIA issue. For nearly 20 years, this 1969 West Point graduate was a prisoner of war - alive or dead. His family now knows with certainty that he is dead, but may never learn how - or when - he died.

In addition to the reports regarding Brownlee's death, a South Vietnamese soldier reported that he observed the capture of one "big" American from the camp. Another report described the capture of a U.S. Captain stationed at the camp.

Since the war ended, reports and refugee testimony have convinced many authorities that not only do the Vietnamese possess several hundred sets of Americans' remains, more startlingly, they also control hundreds of living American prisoners.



Some Biographical and loss information on POW's provided
by Operation Just Cause have been supplied by
Chuck and Mary Schantag
of POWNET.  Please check with  http://www.asde.com/~pownet  
regularly for updates.







ARMISTICE DAY* MEMORIAL DAY* VETERANS DAY
All days for All veterans
With the percentage of the population who wore a uniform rapidly declining, appreciation for the sacrifices made by veterans is correspondingly diminishing. This year observe Memorial Day as it was intended and not just another day off from work. Be aware that we owe an eternal debt of gratitude to the millions of Americans who served and sacrificed. That they date back to the Revolution.

*It is the veteran, not the reporter, who has given us freedom of the press.
*It is the veteran, not the poet, who has given us freedom of speech.
*It is the veteran, not the campus organizer, who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.
* It is the veteran, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to a fair trial.
* It is the veteran who salutes the flag, serves under the flag, and who's coffin is draped by the flag, who allow protesters to burn the flag.

Semper Fi- William L. Washington
M/Sgt USMC (Ret)




Informative Links


National Alliance of Families

Operation Just Cause

Col. Ted Guy USAF (Ret)








KISS THE BOYS GOODBYE,
by Monika Jensen-Stevenson & William Stevenson Dutton Press


Personal Links


Ashlandbelle's Home Page

Historical Southern Plantations

Southern Sayings Page

My experience with Hurricane Katrina...

FINALLY FREE From Clinton's Clutches Page








Any comments or suggestions-
please leave message in my guestbook and an email address for contact.

View my Guestbook
Free Guestbooks by Bravenet.com





Remains Returned graphic by Rosebud


POW/MIA Ring

This POW/MIA Ring site
is owned by KimberlySite ID#36

[ Next | Previous | Skip | Random Site ]
[ List Sites | Stats | Join ]

Proud Member of the POW/MIA Freedom Fighters.
Get a POW/MIA Honor Page of your own.



ojcring.jpg

This site is owned by Kimberly Greiner

[Next] [Previous] [Random] [List] [Info] [Join]




AWARDS THIS SITE HAS RECIEVED